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MunichJS is a user group in Munich for developers (amateurs, journeymen and gurus) that meets monthly to discuss topics on JavaScript and ECMAScript. Meetings take place  in each month on different locations. The group was established in October 2010 at the BarCamp in Munich.

Our aims and objectives

  • to help the Munich programmers to obtain broader knowledge in JavaScript programming.
  • to foster closer relationship between local and international JavaScript programmers, and other (academic and professional) groups in the field of JavaScript programming.
  • to organize meetups, trainings, conferences and activities that contribute in strengthening the better understanding of programming JavaScript and related web technologies.

How you can support

  • join us (Facebook, Google Groups, Twitter)
  • come to our next meetup
  • blog, write articles (Hashtag #munichjs)
  • spread the word
  • follow us on Twitter
  • join us on Google Groups
  • You are the group! Give a talk about your favourite framework, your personal JavaScript-Pacman-clone or every other experience you made with JavaScript.
  • if you have the chance to supply us, then sponsor us a location or pizza and beer for the next meetups.

New members and speakers are always welcome!

Please send a message to info@munichjs.org if you would like to give a presentation, or if you have a suggestion for a topic.

How and when did JavaScript evolve?

It all started during the first full-moon phase of 2004. Brendan Eich was on a sabbatical, likely doing drugs somewhere in the south-east region of Ghana. Engineers from GMail and Flickr were becoming well known for their javascript-inspired sonnets and Douglas Crockford was on the seventh level of enlightenment, while discovering The Good Parts at Yahoo! …

Alex Sexton

“ Rather than dumb luck, I think a more meaningful interpretation is that I was a piece of an evolving system, exploring one particular path in a damn hurry. That system contains people playing crucial parts. Academic, business, and personal philosophical and friendship agendas all transmitted an analogue of genes: ideas and concrete inventions from functional programming and Smalltalk-related languages. ”

Brendan Eich

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